Category Archive: Privacy principles

Beyond compliance: the Seven Deadly Sins of privacy management

By Simon Davies Any company that has a data protection officer or privacy adviser will understand the fundamental risks of bad data management. Keeping too much customer information – and for too long. Failing to provide even basic security measures. Risking data breaches because of poor staff training and support. These are obvious 1.0.1 aspects …

Continue reading »

Read More...

The twenty privacy principles translated into Spanish

With huge thanks to our friend and Privacy Surgeon collaborator Gemma Galdon Clavell for this translation Los 20 principios sobre la privacidad que no te enseñarán en la escuela Por Simon Davies PRINCIPIOS GENERALES 1.    Las organizaciones responsables describen la privacidad como un ‘derecho’, las que no se enteran hablan de ella como un ‘valor’ …

Continue reading »

Read More...

The twenty privacy principles they never taught you at school

By Simon Davies GENERAL PRINCIPLES 1. Responsible organisations describe privacy as a “right”, unaware ones talk of it as a “value” and bad players lambast it as an “interest”. 2. Most people in power only support privacy rights when they’re about to get dumped into a scandal. 3. Claims of a conflict between privacy and …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Should privacy advocates justify surveillance by measuring its benefits?

By Simon Davies A controversy has been slipping increasingly into the privacy realm over the past couple of years. It concerns the question of whether intrusive surveillance can be justified through its results. That’s to say, if surveillance can be shown to – even marginally – benefit public safety, should we accept it? It’s the …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Seven lies about privacy (and how you can debunk them)

By Simon Davies No human right has ever been subjected to as much deception and attack as privacy. I mean, no-one tries to dilute protections against torture by saying “it doesn’t really hurt anyone”. But privacy is open-season for anyone with an interest in killing it off. Here we summarise seven of the most common …

Continue reading »

Read More...

A brief explanation of why Britain’s government is poisonous to privacy

By Simon Davies Some people might reluctantly forgive the British Tory party over its recent history of intolerance, political self-interest and electoral deceit – in the same way that they might forgive a snake for acting like a snake. It’s in the blood. But even by Tory standards, this current conservative government has embarked on …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Who are these “Chief Privacy Officers” and why didn’t they blow the whistle on the NSA?

By Simon Davies The US government has a lot of explaining to do about the role of its oversight Privacy Officers in the NSA affair. In short, these watchdogs appear to have done nothing, but have entirely escaped media and political scrutiny. In theory, privacy oversight over NSA-related matters rests with the CPO’s of the …

Continue reading »

Read More...

It’s time for companies to become champions of rights and build a new accord with the public

  By Simon Davies To one extent or another all companies that provide online services have become outsourced agents of government. Their vast archives of personal data are a cost-effective resource for security and law enforcement agencies which often require little more than basic paperwork to secure the target information. Companies will tell you that …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Pakistan government admits secret “censorship arrangement” with Facebook

By Simon Davies A senior Pakistan government official has told the High Court of Lahore that Facebook has entered into a covert working relationship with national authorities to censor online content. The admission was made earlier this month during a hearing of public interest claims brought by Bytes for All Pakistan (B4A) against the government’s …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Right or wrong, it’s time for Google to disclose its relationship with government

By Simon Davies Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has repeated claims that Google is up to its neck in the machinations of the White House Administration. This claim raises some critically important questions. Speaking this week via video link to the 19th International Symposium on Electronic Art Assange warned “Google wants to ingratiate itself in the …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Older posts «