Category Archive: Privacy in culture

Seven lies about privacy (and how you can debunk them)

By Simon Davies No human right has ever been subjected to as much deception and attack as privacy. I mean, no-one tries to dilute protections against torture by saying “it doesn’t really hurt anyone”. But privacy is open-season for anyone with an interest in killing it off. Here we summarise seven of the most common …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Analysis: who should become the first UN rapporteur on privacy?

 By Simon Davies Back in March, the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) adopted a resolution to appoint a Special Rapporteur on Privacy. This was a landmark decision – and one that is well overdue. The role will be pivotal. A Special Rapporteur has the potential to create clarity and focus on a massively complex issue …

Continue reading »

Read More...

How a dog and some chocolate biscuits reveal an identity crisis in America

By Simon Davies Overpriced bourbon isn’t the only reason why San Francisco’s International House of Wine & Liquor is noteworthy. The last time I was there a year or two ago, anyone of any age who buys a packet of cigarettes there is forced to disclose an identity document. A slightly luminescent pink sign on …

Continue reading »

Read More...

What the Italians can teach us about home security

By Simon Davies For some decades, many Americans have felt deeply anxious about their personal security. This anxiety became so embedded that by 1980 two-thirds of the nation reported feeling “highly fearful” of becoming a victim of violent crime. You might imagine that this fear would be reflected in an obsession with proven and robust …

Continue reading »

Read More...

The Trans-Atlantic divide on privacy just became a little wider

By Simon Davies Over the past three weeks the so-called “Trans-Atlantic Divide” on privacy between the US and Europe has widened significantly. This shift could indicate new dynamics in the global push on America to institute more meaningful privacy safeguards for non-US persons. In this short period the European Parliament and the European courts have …

Continue reading »

Read More...

How a surprising blog post helped shift Japan’s perception of civil liberties

By Simon Davies In recent days a rather odd sequence of events has unfurled in Japan which has led some observers to speculate that this endlessly surprising nation is starting to wake from its 40-year slumber over privacy and civil liberties. Over the past few decades the Japanese population has been ambivalent about rights issues, …

Continue reading »

Read More...

India takes its first serious step toward privacy regulation – but it may be misguided

 By Simon Davies The world’s second-most populous nation may be on the cusp of embracing privacy legislation. After several false starts the Indian government appears ready to accept the need for some form of regulation. Well, maybe this is a slightly optimistic view. A more accurate portrayal might be “the Indian government appears ready to …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Easter rant: Hot Desking is a privacy issue, but few people will speak out against it

By Simon Davies The Easter long weekend is upon us, and in Britain many companies are using the holiday break to move premises. Staff should now eagerly look forward to a gleaming new office on Tuesday. Well, they should be looking forward to it, but many aren’t. For them Tuesday is a dreadful prospect – …

Continue reading »

Read More...

People aren’t conflicted about privacy – they just appear that way

By Simon Davies People often ask me to explain why privacy seems such a incongruous concept. Why is it that people who proclaim to love privacy will sometimes cheerfully give it away? Why do some people who oppose ID cards because they are instruments of government intrusion, contemporaneously support national security powers that are an …

Continue reading »

Read More...

India’s first major privacy survey reveals deep concern over intrusion

By Simon Davies India’s largest-ever privacy survey has revealed a high degree of concern over encroachment into private life. The survey, published earlier today, polled the views of more than ten thousand people and concluded that Indian residents believe the threat of privacy invasion is now largely out of control. The survey – which was …

Continue reading »

Read More...

Older posts «